Ginnifer Goodwin, Josh Dallas, Emilie de Ravin and Jared Gilmore also not Returning to ‘Once Upon a Time’

Ginnifer Goodwin, Josh Dallas, Emilie de Ravin, and Jared Gilmore will not return to Once Upon a Time after season 6, EW has learned.

The news comes following the previously announced exits of Jennifer Morrison and Rebecca Mader. Once Upon a Time, which was officially renewed for season 7 on Thursday, will now be centered on Regina (Lana Parrilla), Rumple (Robert Carlyle), and Hook (Colin O’Donoghue).

Goodwin, Dallas, and Gilmore, who are original cast members from the pilot, play Snow White, Prince Charming, and Henry Mills, respectively. Snow and Charming are the parents of Emma (Morrison), while Henry is Emma and Regina’s (Parrilla) son. De Ravin, meanwhile, joined the show later in season 1 as the iconic Beauty and the Beast heroine Belle.

Executive producers Adam Horowitz and Edward Kitsis crafted a detailed statement about the many exits and the possibility they will return:

“Words can’t do justice to what Ginny, Josh, Emilie, Rebecca and Jared brought to Once Upon a Time… but we’ll try… never have we had the privilege of working with a more talented group of collaborators.  Each brought unique talent, incredible intelligence, and their own individual bit of magic as they gave life to these iconic characters.

Ginny reinvented Snow White for a modern audience – there was no way she would be stuck cleaning up after dwarfs, she created an iconic empowered heroine for the 21st century.

Josh mined the depths of Prince Charming – a character who in myth was just a ‘type’ but in his superlative interpretation became a complex man fighting for love and family.  

Emilie took the character of Belle to a deep and soulful place, bringing great intelligence and warmth to the character, making her fiercely independent, strong willed but also an eternal optimist who saw only the best in all those she encountered.

Rebecca took us on a broomstick roller coaster ride as she re-invented the Wicked Witch of the West by finding the pain beneath the green. She made the character soar to incredible heights while always keeping her grounded and relatable.

And Jared literally grew up before the eyes of millions, from a child actor with enormous innate talent to a young man whose abilities continue to astound as he created a character who truly, as we say on the show, has the heart of the truest believer.

We can’t thank them enough for the hard work, dedication, and passion they delivered day in and day out. Without them there would be no Once Upon a Time.

As Once continues, this group will always be the beating heart of the show. And even though we won’t be with them every week, in a show about magic and hope, we fervently believe it won’t be the last we see of them.

Earlier this year, ABC chief Channing Dungey seemed to indicate there could be possible exits should the show be renewed, noting that the OUAT bosses were looking at the potential seventh season as a springboard in a new direction, “which doesn’t necessarily mean that we’re not bringing cast back. It’s just: How do you kind of hit the reset button in a way that gives you an opportunity to expand the stories that we’re telling?” Dungey said.

OUAT’s season finale, which will air Sunday, is slated to provide a sense of closure, while also launching a new chapter for season 7. That new phase will include the introduction of characters played by The Walking Dead alum Andrew J. West and Jane the Virgin star Alison Fernandez, who will both appear in the season 6 finale, with the potential for more.

However, Horowitz and Kitsis have previously noted that season 7 will not go through a complete overhaul. “We’re not designing this in a way where you say goodbye to everyone and never see them again,” Horowitz said. “We’ve been telling a story for six years now for these characters and now we’re trying to complete that story, but that doesn’t mean they don’t have other stories.”

When EW hit the set of the ABC fairy tale drama earlier this year, both Dallas and Goodwin seemed optimistic that the show could continue on even with a new set of characters. “Because things are always so new on our show, there would have to be a radical change in order to infuse it with new direction, and so I’m all for it,” Goodwin said. “I feel like these guys are the epitome of creativity, and if anybody can continue a show that’s been this inventive, and new, and has always gone in a million directions at once in the most entertaining way, I think its Eddy and Adam, and I’m ecstatic to see what happens.”

Dallas concurred: “The great thing about Eddy and Adam, and the great thing about the show and the characters that they’ve created is that they’re always reinventing themselves,” he said. “I think that’s only right with Once Upon a Time that at the end of this season, if it indeed comes back, that it has a completely different reboot, and it goes in a different direction. It’s fitting that Once Upon a Time changes as well as its characters.”

Even so, both seemed hopeful it’s not the last we’d see of Snow and Charming. “I hope there’s always some Snow story to tell,” Goodwin said at the time. “I have discussed with the guys that in whatever capacity Snow should appear to do right by the story then I will definitely contribute for sure.”

Once Upon a Time‘s two-hour finale airs Sunday at 8 p.m. ET on ABC.

From Entertainment Weekly

Disney’s ‘Zootopia’ Opens Big With $73.7 Million Debut

Disney’s “Zootopia” scored the fourth biggest March opening, debuting to $73.7 million over the weekend.

The animated story about a rabbit who joins the police force outstripped “Frozen,” the 2012 blockbuster that bowed to $67.4 million. With no major family film opening until “The Jungle Book” lands on April 15, “Zootopia” is well positioned to be the defacto choice for moviegoers with children for the next month. Disney did not release a budget, but most animated films cost in excess of $100 million. “Zootopia” screened in 3,827 locations.

“There’s an absence of competition,” said Dave Hollis, Disney’s distribution chief. “We are set up to have a big, big run.”

Overseas, where “Zootopia” has been playing for three weeks, the film added another $63.4 million to its haul, pushing its global total to $232.5 million. The film continues a sterling comeback run for Disney Animation, which had reached a creative and commercial nadir in the early aughts with the likes of “Home on the Range” and “Treasure Planet.” Since Pixar’s Ed Catmull and John Lasseter took the reins following Disney’s 2006 acquisition of their company, the animation arm has roared back to life, fielding hits such as “Frozen,” “Tangled,” and “Wreck It Ralph,” and winning Oscars.

“They brought a focus on quality,” said Hollis. “They recognize that quality is the best business plan.”

‘Zootopia’ Could Score $75M Weekend After Mammoth $19.5M Friday

With all of the talk about prime release dates and would-be blockbuster seasons, there is a long and healthy history of animated features kicking proverbial box office butt in the first few months of the year. We’ve got The LEGO Movie, the first two Ice Age movies, Rio and Rio 2Rango, and a bunch of DreamWorks Animation movies scattered around this general area (Monsters v AliensThe CroodsHow to Train Your Dragon) over the years. Due to happenstance or circumstance, Walt Disney hasn’t released an in-house major-league toon in this spot since Meet the Robinsons way back in 2007. And now, with basically every other animation distribution channel having its way with the pre-summer season, it’s time for the Mouse House to kick a little butt here too. Enter Zootopia, which may well be the fairest of them all.

Bolstered by clever marketing campaign (including viral posters that spoofed popular and Oscar-nominated 2015 releases), near-perfect reviews, and the good fortune of having an uncommonly crowd-pleasing trailer play on nearly every single theatrical print of Star Wars: The Force AwakensZootopia kicked off the month with a terrific $19.469 million Friday. The Friday figure includes $1.7m worth of Thursday previews, which is a record for a non-Pixar  Walt Disney animated feature. The hard Friday number is merely the second best in this relative calendar point for an animated film. It trails only Ice Age 2 ($21m back in 2006) and is ahead of Monsters v Aliens ($16.7m in 2009), The Lorax ($17.5m in 2012), and The Lego Movie ($17m in 2014) regarding animated openings for this period.

Now, where Zootopia ends up over the weekend is merely a point of math. Ice Age: The Meltdown and Rio 2 were a bit frontloaded, earning 3.1x their Friday figures while The Lorax  snagged just over 4x its Friday figuresas kid-driven matinee business exploded over Saturday and Sunday. So expect a weekend between $60 million and $78m, with the happy medium being $67.5m. Disney would love to best the $67.5m Fri-Sun opening weekend of Frozen (biggest Fri-Sun for a Disney toon), to say nothing of the $69m debut haul of The LEGO Movie or the $70m opening of The Lorax. Inflation notwithstanding, if they can hit $70.5m, they will have topped all but Monsters University ($82m), Inside Out ($90m), and Toy Story 3 ($110m) among Pixar openings.

If the Ginnifer Goodwin/Jason Bateman/Idris Elba animated film noir/race relations parable tops the $62.7 million debut of Inception, it’ll be among the ten biggest debuts for an original movie of all time. If it tops $70.5m, it’ll be the third largest behind Avatar ($77m) and Inside Out ($90m). Concerning animation, a $68m debut puts it 16th on the list of all-time animated debuts while a $70.5m debut puts it ninth and a $75m debut edges The Simpsons ($74m) for eighth place. So there’s a lot of wiggle room depending on that multiplier.

Either way, this is a fantastic opening for a terrific movie and a huge win for art and commerce. I wish the picture weren’t as painfully timely as it happens to be, but that won’t hurt its reception or its bottom line. Oh, and it crossed $100 million worldwide on Friday (including $12.3m in its first two days in China), so it’s got that going for it too.

From Forbes